Mar
17
2013

WHO launches Global status report on road safety 2013

The World Health Organisation launched the ‘Global status report on road safety 2013’. According to this report only 28 countries, covering 7% of the world’s population, have comprehensive road safety laws on all five key risk factors: drinking and driving, speeding, and failing to use motorcycle helmets, seat-belts, and child restraints.

The report is the second in a series analysing to what extent countries are implementing a number of effective road safety measures. In addition to the five risk factors noted above, it highlights the importance of issues such as vehicle safety standards; road infrastructure inspections; policies on walking and cycling; and aspects of pre-hospital care systems. It also indicates if countries have a national strategy which sets measurable targets to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on the roads.

The report shows:

  • In 2010, there were 1.24 million deaths worldwide from road traffic crashes, roughly the same number as in 2007.
  • only 28 countries, covering 7% of the world’s population, have comprehensive road safety laws on all five key risk factors (listed above)
  • 88 Member States were able to reduce the number of road traffic fatalities, in 87 member states that number increased.
  • 59% of those who are killed in road traffic crashes are between the ages of 15 and 44 years, and 77% are male.
  • Pedestrians and cyclists constitute 27% of all road deaths. In some countries this figure is higher than 75%.

The risk of dying as a result of a road traffic injury is highest in the WHO African Region at 24.1 per 100,000 population and lowest in the WHO European Region at 10.3 per 100,000 population.

The pace of legislative change needs to rapidly accelerate if the number of deaths from road traffic crashes is to be substantially reduced, according to the Global status report on road safety 2013: supporting a decade of action, published today by the World Health Organization (WHO).

If you want to read the full report, please go to: http://who.int/violence_injury_prevention/road_safety_status/2013/en/index.html